Join Hunter Nation in Delisting the Gray Wolf

The Real Wolf Facts!

"Learn the true wolf Story."

Due to unmanaged populations, wolves are a real threat to wildlife, hunting and more..

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The Leaders of HN have lead the national effort in the past (killing wolves in ID, MT and WY) and will again for WI, MI, MN, CO, UT, NM, and AZ

2011 US Congress passed legislation removing wolves from Endangered species protection and this decision was NOT subject to federal judicial review (why ID, MT and WY are still killing wolves, courts cant stop the hunts). This action was defended clear to the US Supreme court and we won!

Lead effort in 2019 to file lawsuit and won, forcing the State of WI to hold a wolf hunt, where some 225 wolves were killed in a 72 hour hunt - proves to many wolves, didn't dent wolf population.

2020 lead effort to be there when the US Department of Interior and the US fish and Wildlife Service removed wolves from CO, UT, ND, KS, MI, WI, MN, NM, AZ and other states. This action was in place for six months, until, like in 2010, a federal judge from CA placed wolves back on the Endangered List in all states but WY, ID and MT.

2023 and Beyond - Permanent Solutions for WI, MI, MN, ND, SD, KS, UT, CO, NM and AZ - like the US Congress did in 2011, they must pass legislation to make wolf management by the states above permanent.  This is the only solution to keep wolves into state management

The Problem

  • Politics

    Wolves are part of nature. They should be treated as all of our wild animals. Well managed, they are an asset to every American. Unmanaged, they are a costly liability to our society.

  • Perception

    For decades, highly funded groups claiming to be conservations have raised and spent millions of dollars to alter the public perceptions of the wolf and influence politicians to vote the way those groups demanded.

  • Reality

    The wolf no longer warrants being listed as Endangered. Congress needs to act to insure ESA decisions are made based on science and not arbitrarily by activist judges.

  • The Solution

    The solution lies here in your hand and what you and others like you do next. Take a moment, read our plan, check our partners and see how we can help you help save the wildlife of North America.

Our Plan

Our plan is simple, but it won’t be easy.

  • Educate & Unite Americans

    It’s time for hunters, conservationist, and all Americans who care about honest wildlife management, based on sound science, to stand up and speak loudly the truth about wolves. Hunter Nation has assembled a team of experts and influencers who are committed to getting the truth out.

  • Get The Truth Out

    The time has come for the wolf to be an asset instead of a political pawn to be used by the anti-hunting, anti-science, so called “animal rights” groups. Wolf reintroduction efforts are a conservation success! Wolf populations have met all recovery goals and need to be delisted immediately.

  • Delist The Wolf

    We will work with industry leaders, elected officials and American hunters to stop the cycle of litigation and judicial interference to insure the wolf is delisted in the lower 48 states.

Gray wolves hunting, eating and resting.

A Few of the Facts

Yellowstone National Park

Elk population plummeted after wolves were turned loose in the park in 1995

In the mid 1990s there were nearly 20,000 elk in the Northern Yellowstone elk herd.  While it stabilized around 6,000 in 2000s the population is continues to fall, down 80 percent to less than 4,000 today.

Wisconsin

Annual average deer harvest is down almost 50% since the Wolf population exceed 550.

Wisconsin-Wolf-Population-2022

Minnesota

  • In 1974 – 750 wolves. Now – over 2,600 wolves.
  • In 2006 – 8,800 moose. By 2015 - 3,450 moose.
  • Currently, 1 wolf per 10sq miles, only Alaska has more wolves.

Michigan

  •  90% of residents believe wolves post some threat to pets/livestock.

Montana

  • 2021 - 96 livestock kills by wolves costing taxpayers $103,815.
  • Wolf license sales since 2009 generated $4.8 million for conservation.

Montana

  • Public support for legal wolf hunting is high.

Idaho

  • Currently 1,270 wolves. IFG wants the population to be 500.
1973
1973 – Endangered Species Act of 1973
1973 – Endangered Species Act of 1973

The Endangered Species Act of 1973 provides a framework to conserve and protect endangered and threatened species and their habitats both domestically and abroad. 16 U.S.C. 35 (CHAPTER 35—ENDANGERED SPECIES) enacted on December 38, 1973. (a) Findings The Congress finds and declares that— (1) various species of fish, wildlife, and plants in the United States have been rendered extinct as a consequence of economic growth and development untempered by adequate concern and conservation; (2) other species of fish, wildlife, and plants have been so depleted in numbers that they are in danger of or threatened with extinction; (3) these species…
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1974
1974 The gray wolf placed on the endangered list.
grey wolf

The Gray Wolf (Canis lupus) placed on the endangered list Friday January 4, 1974 - Federal Register - Vol. 39, No 3 - § 17.12 Endangered native wildlife. (Pg 1175) Taking, Possession, Transportation, Sale, Purchase, Barter, Exportation and Importation of Wildlife. . Common Name and Scientific Name Eastern Timber Wolf (Canis lupus lycaon) Northern Rocky Mountain Wolf (Canis lupus irremotus) Red Wolf (Canis rufus) After consultation with the appropriate States and after having reviewed the advice and recommendations of interested persons and organizations as appropriate, the Secretary has determined, in accordance with the provisions of 16 U.S.C. 668aa(c), the following…
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1978
1978 USFWS developed a wolf recovery plan with Two criteria.

USFWS issued a final rule reclassifying the gray wolf as endangered in Minnesota and threatened across the rest of the lower 48 states. The reclassification of the Gray Wolf In the United States and Mexico, with Determination of Critical Habitat in  Michigan and Minnesota Survival of the wolf in Minnesota assured, and At least 1 viable population of eastern timber wolf outside of Minnesota and Isle Royal in lower 48 states is reestablished. 200 wolves for 5 years within 100 miles from Minnesota, or 100 wolves for 5 years if beyond 100 miles from Minnesota.

1980
1980 Northern Rocky Mountain Wolf Recovery Plan
1980 Northern Rocky Mountain Wolf Recovery Plan

In 1980, the Northern Rocky Mountain Wolf Recovery Team completed a plan that would guide wolf recovery efforts for a future wolf population in the northern Rockies. The plan designated three recovery areas - Northwestern Montana, Central Idaho, and the Greater Yellowstone - each of which included some portion of Montana. The primary goal of the plan is to remove the Northern Rocky Mountain wolf from the endangered and threatened species list by securing and maintaining a minimum of 10 breeding pairs of wolves in each of the three recovery areas for a minimum of three successive years. The U.S.…
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1987
1987 Northern Rocky Mountain Wolf Recovery Plan
1987 Northern Rocky Mountain Wolf Recovery Plan

In 1987, the Northern Rocky Mountain Wolf Recovery Team revised the wolf recovery plan from 1980. The primary goal of the plan is to remove the Northern Rocky Mountain wolf from the endangered and threatened species list by securing and maintaining a minimum of 10 breeding pairs of wolves in each of the three recovery areas for a minimum of three successive years.  The plan establishes three recovery areas - Northwestern Montana, Central Idaho, and the Greater Yellowstone - each of which included some portion of Montana.

1992
1992 “Wolves in the great lakes area greatly exceed the recovery criteria.
1992 “Wolves in the great lakes area greatly exceed the recovery criteria.

Wolf population in Minnesota has exceeded 2,000 individuals over the past 20 years, and populations in Michigan and Wisconsin have exceeded 200 wolves for 20 years.” (Per USFWS) There were only 750 wolves in Minnesota when listed in 1974.

1992 Wolves in the great lakes area greatly exceed the recovery criteria

1992 “Wolves in the great lakes area greatly exceed the recovery criteria.  Wolf population in Minnesota has exceeded 2,000 individuals over the past 20 years, and populations in Michigan and Wisconsin have exceeded 200 wolves for 20 years.” (Per USFWS) There were only 750 wolves in Minnesota when listed in 1974.

1995
1996
2000
2000 Montana established conservation and wolf management plan

In 2000 Montana established conservation and management plan including wolf harvest quotas if wolves were Federally delisted and state management goals were met.

2002
2003
2004
2011
2011 Gray Wolf Partially Delisted from the ESA in Wyoming, Montana, Idaho
2011 Gray Wolf Partially Delisted from the ESA in Wyoming, Montana, Idaho

2011 US Congress passes legislation to partially delist the gray wolf from the ESA in Wyoming, Montana, Idaho, and parts of Utah, Washington, and Oregon.  9th Circuit upholds Congressional action in a 9-0 vote.

2021
2021 – Hunter Nation Wins Lawsuit Against Wisconsin DNR
2021 – Hunter Nation Wins Lawsuit Against Wisconsin DNR

Madison, Wisconsin (January 13, 2021) - This week, Hunter Nation, along with the Wisconsin Institute for Law & Liberty, won our lawsuit against the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources for ignoring a state law requirement to schedule a wolf hunt this winter. A Jefferson County Circuit Court found that the Wisconsin DNR violated state law by refusing to schedule a winter 2021 gray wolf hunt when the gray wolf was delisted from the Endangered Species Act on January 4, 2021. This is a historic victory for Wisconsin hunters and our constitutionally protected right to hunt and manage our wildlife here…
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2023
2023 H.R. 764 proposed – Trust the Science Act

H.R. 764 – Summary: Requires the Secretary of the Interior to remove the gray wolf from the list of endangered and threatened wildlife under the Endangered Species Act of 1973.  It also prevents judicial review of the removal.